Review: 10 Things I Can See From Here

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10 Things I Can See From Here

by Carrie Mac

Publication Date:  February 2017

I found this to be an exceptional book in many, many ways.  Readers will find multiple things to connect with in this book: Art, Music, Sexuality, Family Dynamics, Addiction, Death and Birth .  Carrie Mac does a wonderful job of fitting all of the pieces together – it might seem like too much for one text but it words beautifully.  This book is not just Maeve’s story, it’s the story of Maeve and all those that she she loves.

When Maeve must move to Vancouver to live with her recovering alcoholic dad, his pregnant wife and their young twins she is forced to leave behind the safety net she relies on.  Without her mother, her neighbor and her therapist she must face all of her fears alone.  But not really.  And there lies one of the greatest strengths of this book.  No one-dimensional supporting characters here.    Her dad loves her, her stepmother is a delight, her new neighbor adds depth to her life and she meets an intriguing love interest.  And the little brothers! Are! So! Funny! (I feel like the boys talk in! all the time)

Maeve’s inner voice tells the story of anxiety so very well.  First there’s an idea, then there are terrifying statistics about the idea, and finally a hilarious obituary resulting from the idea.  The reader can really understand how Maeve goes from observing a conversation between a traveler and a border patrol agent to mass murder on a bus via household tools.

I highly recommend this book, but must add one concern.

Anxiety Disorder is a crushing condition that many people do not understand.  It goes far beyond worrying and requires specialized care and intervention for the individual to be able to reach their daily living goals.    I was disappointed in only once part of the book:  Maeve’s parent do not allow her to take any medication, and I find their reasoning insufficient.  My concern is that teens reading this book will question their own medical choices 

“But my parents actually agreed on a lot of things, and one of them was that they wouldn’t let me take prescription drugs for my anxiety until I was an adult.  Your brain is still developing, Maeve.  You might grow out of it.  It’s too soon, they said.  I disagreed.  My brain was hard-wired differently.  What was the point of trying to put out a wildfire by pissing on it?”

Maybe I’m making too much of this.  It certainly did not keep me from devouring this book.

Source:  ARC from publisher

Audience:  high school

 

 

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